This is the stunning, unique and precious Rio Chama Watershed, New Mexico

Bepuwaveh, Bienvenidos, Welcome

Who are Rio Arriba Concerned Citizens?

We are a grassroots organization that defends against Oil and Gas development in the Rio Chama Watershed, NM while educating and advocating for sustainable, safe energy and income sources in our region.

Our Considerations Are:

  • To inform and educate our community on current issues that affect public health, safety, land, air and water quality in the Rio Chama Watershed.
  • To promote the Rio Chama Watershed as a model for sustainable development and renewable energy.
  • To stand for the “Frontier District” as designated in the Rio Arriba County Oil and Gas Ordinance (2009). This district is east of the Continental Divide and home of the Rio Chama Watershed.
  • To maintain a relationship with Federal, State, and County decision-makers to provide information and education concerning Oil and Gas development and promoting Green Energy to the wider community.

Keep up with the latest environmental and sustainability news affecting our Watershed, region and the wider world via our Facebook stream.

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Chaco has been declared a "sacrifice zone" thereby justifying oil and gas and mineral extraction. We all know U.S. historical monuments or places nationally revered would not even remotely be considered areas for oil and gas exploration, yet alone exploitation. Ten mile protections is not nearly enough. Let's keep raising our voices.

" Nov. 17th - Counselor, NM—Today, U.S. Representative Teresa Leger Fernandez and Sen. Ben Ray Lujan introduced the Chaco Cultural Heritage Area Protection Act, a move recognized by the Greater Chaco Coalition as a step in the right direction. Though the Coalition supports this legislation, more needs to be done to address the cumulative impact of extractive industries on the Greater Chaco Landscape and its communities.

This bill would withdraw federal minerals from new oil and gas leasing within a 10-mile buffer surrounding Chaco Culture National Historical Park, while recognizing that the Greater Chaco Landscape extends well beyond this ten-mile buffer. The bill affirms the need for health studies on the impacts of fracking in the region.

Though there is widespread support for protecting cultural resources and public health beyond the proposed 10-mile buffer, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) continues to rubber stamp industrialized fracking across the region, with more than 90% of the landscape already leased for oil and gas. By the Bureau’s own analysis, the proposed mineral withdrawal will have minimal impact on oil and gas extraction – reducing gas production only 0.5 percent, and oil production a mere 2.5 percent.

Secretary Haaland has committed the landmark Honoring Chaco Initiative to address landscape-level management, which the Greater Chaco Coalition hopes will finally address the cumulative impacts of oil and gas extraction across the Greater Chaco Landscape and chart a path towards a more just future. "Coalition declares bill introduction as positive first step, but calls for more to address legacies of sacrifice zones and environmental justice for communities and the Greater Chaco Landscape.
#FrackOffChaco #EnvironmentalJustice

wildearthguardians.org/press-releases/greater-chaco-coalition-statement-on-chaco-cultural-heritag...
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Chaco has been declared a sacrifice zone thereby justifying oil and gas and mineral extraction. We all know U.S. historical monuments or places nationally revered would not even remotely be considered areas for oil and gas exploration, yet alone exploitation. Ten mile protections is not nearly enough. Lets keep raising our voices.
 Nov. 17th - Counselor, NM—Today, U.S. Representative Teresa Leger Fernandez and Sen. Ben Ray Lujan introduced the Chaco Cultural Heritage Area Protection Act, a move recognized by the Greater Chaco Coalition as a step in the right direction. Though the Coalition supports this legislation, more needs to be done to address the cumulative impact of extractive industries on the Greater Chaco Landscape and its communities.
This bill would withdraw federal minerals from new oil and gas leasing within a 10-mile buffer surrounding Chaco Culture National Historical Park, while recognizing that the Greater Chaco Landscape extends well beyond this ten-mile buffer. The bill affirms the need for health studies on the impacts of fracking in the region.
Though there is widespread support for protecting cultural resources and public health beyond the proposed 10-mile buffer, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) continues to rubber stamp industrialized fracking across the region, with more than 90% of the landscape already leased for oil and gas. By the Bureau’s own analysis, the proposed mineral withdrawal will have minimal impact on oil and gas extraction – reducing gas production only 0.5 percent, and oil production a mere 2.5 percent.
Secretary Haaland has committed the landmark Honoring Chaco Initiative to address landscape-level management, which the Greater Chaco Coalition hopes will finally address the cumulative impacts of oil and gas extraction across the Greater Chaco Landscape and chart a path towards a more just future.
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Help us keep this beautiful land and water pristine for another 100 million years.